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Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Frank About... Hot German Potato Salad

I had the wonderful opportunity this afternoon to appear on the Cooking With Carol segment of KSN 16's Living Well afternoon show. I had a great time chatting with Carol Parker about the blog, cooking, and German traditions, while preparing Janice Peiffer's (my wife's grandmother) handed-down hot German potato salad recipe.

As I explained in the segment, German potato salads primarily differ in the way the potatoes are prepared and served, and the type of dressing. Many German potato salads use a strong, vinegar-forward dressing, diced potatoes, and are often cold. This is the style of German potato salad you would find in the Southeast Kansas chicken restaurants.  This recipe differs in that it uses a sweet & sour, creamier dressing. Also, I prefer to prepare the potatoes by boiling them whole, with skin on. This style is referred to in German cooking, as "boiling with their jackets on." It takes longer to cook the potatoes, but it seems to result in a better consistency of the potato texture. I also like slices of potato in the salad, rather than diced or rough chopped. The slices should hold up well enough to not turn the salad into a mushy mess.

Here is the segment from the Living Well website:


If you have arrived at my blog after seeing the show, today, please check out my Facebook page for Frank About Food, where I post food-related articles, pictures, and similar tidbits, on a more discussion-inspiring forum at Facebook.com/FrankAboutFood

I also have a Twitter account for the same type of postings. The Twitter handle is @FrankAboutFood

And now, the recipe... Pros't!


Hot German Potato Salad

5 lb. Russet potatoes
1 pkg. (1 lb.) bacon
3-4 C. (~ 3 medium) white onion, diced
½ C. sugar
4 Tblsp. flour
1 Tblsp. salt
3 eggs, beaten
1½ C. white vinegar
1 C. COLD water
1 C. HOT water
2 tsp. yellow mustard

  1. Scrub the potatoes and boil them, whole, until fork meets a slight resistance when       inserted. Drain, cool, peel, and slice.
  2. While the potatoes cook, cook the bacon, reserving all the drippings. Chop or crumble the cooked bacon.
  3. Using approximately half the volume of the bacon drippings, sauté the diced onions over medium to medium-high heat until translucent, and very lightly browned. Do not drain the drippings from the onions.
  4. Combine the sugar, flour, and salt in a small bowl.
  5. Combine the beaten eggs, cold water, and vinegar in a saucepan. Slowly whisk in the dry ingredient mixture, and add the 1 C. of hot water. Cook over medium heat, whisking frequently, until it thickens.
  6. Finish the dressing by whisking in the yellow mustard.
  7. Combine the potatoes, bacon, and onions (including the bacon drippings in which they cooked) in a large mixing bowl, or pan. Add ladles or spoonfuls of the dressing and stir to combine. If serving the next day, reserve some dressing to warm and add to the warmed up salad the next day.

Frank’s Notes:
  1. The salad is best made the day prior to your dinner or event, and refrigerated overnight. The next day, warm it in a 350° until heated thoroughly, adding reserved dressing to achieve desired consistency.
  2. The 5 lb. potato batch of salad is perfect for average events and dinner parties. Recipe can easily be scaled for larger events, or scaled down for a very small dinner. But, believe me, you will hardly EVER have leftovers!

2 comments:

  1. I agree about cooking the potatoes whole, I have been doing this for years and my potato salad is always a huge hit. I make an American version with pickles and all of that. My other secret is to chop the pickles and avoid that nasty pickle relish stuff at the store. LOL

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  2. Nice job Frank. I'm certain that Mom had a big heavenly smile on her face.

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